Done with that Christmas tree? Stick it at the curb

Solid-Waste-Authority122111-npt-cp-santas-2Right about now, if you haven’t already, you’re stripping the last of the light strings and ornaments off your Christmas tree. Now what?

It’s not complicated. Just place it at the curb, like any other landscape trash, on the scheduled pickup day, the Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County says.

The authority said that’s for people living outside municipalities; if you live in a city or town, check with its officials for their procedures. If you live in a multi-home community with dumpster service, contact your homeowners association or property management company directly

As a general rule, the authority said, trees can be up to eight feet long — if yours is longer, cut it in half — and weigh no more than 50 pounds. Remember to remove all decorations, lights and tinsel.

The authority said collected Christmas trees are burned in its giant waste-to-energy plants, although some are mulched and used on authority properties.

For more, call 561-697-2700 or 866-SWA-INFO (866-792-4636).

Are you properly disposing of holiday trash? Take Solid Waste Authority quiz

christmas-lightSolid-Waste-AuthorityDo you recycle your Christmas lights? What about ribbons and bows?

Not sure? Take this holiday recycling quiz from the Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County.

Then let us know how you did. (Some of us not so well.)

 

 

Palm Beach County: You recycled 8 Eiffel Towers

082713-met-recycle-11Solid-Waste-AuthorityLeaving your Palm Beach Post at the curb — after you’ve read every word, of course — continues to pay off.

Residents recycled 816,000 tons of material in the budget year ending Sept. 30, allowing the Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County to pass on nearly a half million dollars to area cities, the authority said Friday.

By the way, that 81,600 tons — 163 million pounds — equals the weight of eight Eiffel Towers.

The authority’s Municipal Revenue Share Program rewards its municipal partners, who collect the recyclables, with a portion of proceeds; this year’s total was $497,000. Since the program started in 2010, the authority has distributed nearly $8.5 million to participating cities to use as they wish.

This budget year’s breakdown by municipality, sorted by biggest share since 2010:

Municipality   2016 share Tons since 2010   Share since 2010
Boca Raton $74,255 51,419 $1,262,514
West Palm Beach $71,036 50,668 $1,234,537
Delray Beach $46,230 32,306 $783,413
Palm Beach Gardens $38,788 27,110 $657,485
Jupiter $39,389 27,060 $653,796
Boynton Beach $34,720 24,722 $598,356
Wellington $34,804 24,154 $584,373
Riviera Beach $23,528 17,160 $419,300
Greenacres $22,100 15,750 $383,205
Royal Palm Beach $19,620 13,566 $328,472
Palm Beach $16,260 11,035 $263,862
North Palm Beach $14,158 9,511 $227,791
Palm Springs $12,554 8,192 $195,862
Lantana $6,991 5,278 $133,214
Highland Beach $4,961 3,563 $86,762
Tequesta $4,435 3,155 $76,716
Juno Beach $3,909 2,699 $64,595
Lake Park $4,520 2,665 $61,909
Pahokee $2,631 1,957 $48,004
Hypoluxo $2,481 1,789 $43,494
South Palm Beach $2,180 1,577 $38,368
Lake Clarke Shores $2,180 1,563 $38,143
Ocean Ridge $2,030 1,465 $35,709
Loxahatchee Groves $1,954 1,373 $33,317
Atlantis $1,804 1,306 $31,865
Palm Beach Shores $1,654 1,162 $28,191
Belle Glade $1,495 1,055 $25,552
South Bay $1,353 1,013 $25,029
Haverhill $1,052 739 $17,940
Mangonia Park $977 687 $16,660
Gulf Stream $977 624 $14,711
Briny Breezes $752 528 $12,814
Manalapan $651 318 $7,713
Jupiter Inlet $376 264 $6,408
Village of Golf $226 182 $4,681
Glen Ridge $150 106 $2,563
Cloud Lake $75 53 $1,281

 

Boogie on and recycle that eight-track!

mnde-travolta-dancing-jpgSolid-Waste-AuthorityLeave it to the folks who recycle many of your throwaways to invoke the image of the eight-track tape player.

The Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County can recycle many of the electronic items that have been sitting in your attic along with those lava lamps and leisure suits, as well as any you’ve gathered in the ensuing years.

Accepted items include audio/visual equipment such as VCRs, and stereos; cellphones and rechargeable batteries; computer central processing units (CPUs) and monitors; laptops; accessories such as keyboards, mouse devices, printers and scanners; televisions; telephones and FAX machines; and even holiday lights.

To recycle items, don’t leave them at the curb; instead take them to one of the authority’s seven recycling Centers. Large quantities might require special disposal; call ahead.

The authority will sort the items and a private contractor will haul them off. Any useful components are processed for reuse; the rest is shredded, with the materials separated by type and recycled into new products.

For more, visit the authority’s electronics recycling web page or call 561-687-1100.