Good ship Ana Cecelia to be sunk Wednesday off Palm Beach County coast

(El Nuevo Herald)
(El Nuevo Herald)

Weather permitting, the Ana Cecelia, a ship that saw both charity and crime will be sunk to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean this morning.

The county’s Department of Environmental Resources Management has set today to drop the 170-foot, 629-ton freighter 75 to 90 feet down off the Port of Palm Beach, making it one of the county’s 150 artificial reefs and the southernmost in a line of 11. It ran humanitarian goods to Cuba but later was seized after drugs were found on it.

When the Ana Cecilia sinks, plaques on it will honor 14-year-olds Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen, who were lost at sea after their 19-foot boat left the Jupiter Inlet on July 24. A third plaque honors Palm Beach County sheriff’s corrections officer Fernandez Jones, his 70-year-old stepfather, Willis Bell, and Jones’ 9-year-old son, Jaden. The three drowned when their boat capsized off Martin County on April 10. A cousin, Robert Stewart, survived.

To read more, go later to mypalmbeachpost.com.

 

 

Ship to be sunk as artificial reef will honor lost Palm Beach County mariners

(El Nuevo Herald)
(El Nuevo Herald)

When the Ana Cecilia sinks to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean next month to become an artificial reef, it also will honor three families whose loved ones were victims of the sea.

Separate plaques affixed to the 170-foot, 629-ton freighter will honor 14-year-olds Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen, lost at sea after their 19-foot boat left the Jupiter Inlet on July 24, 2015.

A third plaque will feature Palm Beach County Sheriff’s corrections officer Fernandas Jones, his 70-year-old stepfather, Willis Bell, and Jones’ 9-year-old son Jayden. The three drowned when their boat capsized off Martin County on April 10. A cousin, Robert Stewart, survived.

Palm Beach County Commissioners and families of the lost mariners will gather next Monday at the Manatee Lagoon, at the Florida Power & Light Co. plant in Riviera Beach, for a dedication ceremony, the county said.

The county’s Department of Environmental Resources Management has set July 6 to drop the Ana Cecilia 75 to 90 feet down off the Port of Palm Beach, making it one of the county’s 150 artificial reefs.

 

 

Martin woman still missing; sensational 1955 Palm Beach County murders led to conviction without bodies

Todd
Todd
Judge Curtis Eugene Chillingworth and his wife, Marjorie Croude McKinley Chillingworth.
Judge Curtis Eugene Chillingworth and his wife, Marjorie Croude McKinley Chillingworth. (Post archives)

Where’s Tricia Todd?

Authorities in Martin County will be back out today searching for the body of the 30-year-old hospice nurse, whose ex-husband has confessed to killing her but so far won’t say where he put her, beyond indicating a wooded area somewhere around Hobe Sound. Sheriff’s deputies already have searched the area for nearly a month without result.

Can a person still be convicted of a murder without a body?

That legal issue came into play in Palm Beach County in what still is regarded the county’s crime of the century: the assassination of Palm Beach County Circuit Judge Curtis Eugene Chillingworth and his wife Marjorie.

According to a 2006 “Post Time” local history column:

Former municipal judge Joseph Peel, was convicted, mostly on the testimony of one of the two hit men, of ordering the murder. The Chillingworths were seized from their oceanfront Manalapan cottage on June 15, 1955, taken by boat out to sea, bound, and tossed overboard. Their bodies never were found. Florida State University criminal justice professor Dale Nute, who rubbed elbows with some of the Chillingworth investigators at the forerunner to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, said he believed it was in fact the first murder conviction obtained in Florida without a body.