Would you live in a shipping container?

Rick Clegg’s shipping container eco retreat with frontage on the Loxahatchee River in Jupiter Friday, November 20, 2015. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

With some people happily living in tiny homes the size of a couple rooms in a traditional house, that’s not as nutty a question as you might think.

Certainly, Craig Vanderlaan, executive director of Crisis Housing Solutions, doesn’t think it’s a crazy notion.

During an affordable housing summit in West Palm Beach Wednesday, he told a ballroom full of county officials, lenders and developers that re-purposed shipping containers can be part of the answer to a problem they said has reached a crisis point.

Vanderlaan said shipping containers have been re-purposed into housing units in the Netherlands, Los Angeles, Michigan and in Washington, D.C.

“You can put 16 to 25 units on a half-acre,” Vanderlaan said as audience members looked at each with expressions that ranged from bemusement to intrigue. “Listen, it’s being done. We are basically shovel ready. We’ve already got the shipping containers being donated.”

Shipping container-like living isn’t just something out of a William Gibson short story. In fact, the concept has already been brought to Palm Beach County.

Rick Clegg has a shipping container “eco retreat” with frontage on the Loxahatchee River in Jupiter.

“People come here to experience what it is like to live in a container, but they come back for the location,” Clegg told The Palm Beach Post in 2015. “This is the first building permit for them in south Florida. They are all welded together. This is where I’m coming in a hurricane.”

Clegg’s retreat brings to mind comments Vanderlaan made on Wednesday.

“Look at ’em like Lego blocks,” he said. “You can fun with this. Millennials love this stuff.”

Traditional residential builders poked fun at the concept.

“I don’t want to live in a container house,” said Tony Palumbo, real estate acquisition director for Pulte, which, according to its web site, builds houses in 50 markets across the country. “I don’t care how cute it looks. And I don’t think my kids do, either.”

As the audience chuckled, Palumbo added: “But I would like to follow it through the permitting process.”

County Administrator Verdenia Baker said the county wouldn’t automatically reject a development project that included shipping container homes.

“I’m interested,” she said. “If they’re dressed properly, then, yes. Why not?”

Baker said her staff would want to make sure the shipping container homes are “durable and stable for us and not a fad.”

Tiny houses considered in addressing big problem in PBC

Darrin and Jodi Swank’s 520-square foot house in Loxahatchee. (Damon Higgins/The Palm Beach Post)

The scarcity of affordable housing in Palm Beach County is a big problem. One county commissioner thinks tiny houses could be, well, at least a tiny part of the solution.

Earlier this week, as county commissioners were getting an update on redevelopment efforts in the Westgate/Belvedere Homes community, Commissioner Melissa McKinlay offered a suggestion: Why not allow tiny houses to be built there?

Tiny houses – the subject of HGTV’s Tiny House Builders show – are an increasingly popular choice for some who want to reduce their impact on the environment, save money and push back against over-consumption.

“Perhaps we could look at some pilot language,” McKinlay said.

There was no vote on the idea, but no one spoke in opposition to it, either. The Westgate Belvedere Homes Community Redevelopment Agency is looking into it, as is county staff.

Commissioners had just finished getting an overview of the county’s workforce housing program and lamented, again, the dearth of affordable housing.

Tiny houses could be an option for single people or young families, McKinlay said, adding that Leon County has already begun approving plans for tiny houses there.

“Maybe we could look at them for an example,” she said.

Darrin and Jodi Swank are raising their three children in a 520-square foot house in Loxahatchee.

“It’s five people in one little house,” Jodi Swank told The Palm Beach Post in July. “We try to live simple. And we’ve loved it.”

Palm Beach County Commission set to OK Uber today

020115-UBER-3UPDATE: Clerk Bock has postponed her report.

Palm Beach County is set today to, finally, approve rules for Uber and Lyft and similar app-based ride operations. After spending more than two and a half hours on April 5, the commission approved the package of rules 7-0, on the first of two votes. The companies say the rules are enough to guarantee they will operate safely. But taxi firms say they don’t go far enough to protect the public and give the ride services an unfair advantage.

Also on Tuesday’s agenda:

Bock: The commission will hear Clerk of Courts Sharon Bock’s annual financial report. Last year, Bock reported that county assets dropped $99.1 million, mostly because the county sold the Mecca Farms property at a $33 million loss and locked into $50 million in new debt over the Max Planck Institute and the Palm Beach County Convention Center.

Trespass: A second and final vote on new rules that allow for banning people from county parks and recreational areas for a year or more for various violations.

Housing: Approved its required Local Housing Assistance Plan for the next three years, as required by the State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP). The plan’s goals are to preserve and increase the stock of affordable housing.

Bus vs. House: Is set to approve a $51,593 settlement for a West Palm Beach man whose home was damaged in March 2013 when it was struck by a Palm Tran bus.

Palm Beach County Commission Meeting:

When: 9:30 a.m. Tuesday. Where: Sixth-floor chambers, Weisman Palm Beach County Governmental Center, 301 N. Olive Avenue, West Palm Beach

To read more, go later to mypalmbeachpost.com.