After ripping Trump, Frankel meets with local mayors

Lois Frankel speaks to the media on March 6, 2017. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel, D-West Palm Beach, held a discussion with mayors in her congressional district Wednesday, when they complained about a lack of mental health resources and sought her help in getting more federal funding.

Frankel started her day by ripping President Donald Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey. But that hot topic gave way to more municipal concerns when the congresswoman met with nine mayors in her district, Chief Deputy Michael Gauger of the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office and Palm Beach County Commissioner Melissa McKinlay.

Frankel reminded those in attendance that a recent federal funding bill includes money for local governments that have incurred security and roadway management expenses during President Trump’s many trips to Palm Beach County.

“The burden is spread out among the taxpayers,” Frankel said before joking that the county could see fewer presidential trips now that the weather is warming.

“All I can say is thank goodness it’s summer,” she said.

Frankel told the mayors Delray Beach is working on an ordinance to regulate sober homes. The mayors said more beds need to be available for the mentally ill and told the congresswoman they’d like to get more federal funding to help with community renovation projects, tearing down abandoned buildings and youth programs that could steer young people away from drugs and make a dent in the opioid crisis.

PBC angered by House passage of expanded homestead exemption

Palm Beach County Commissioner Melissa McKinlay (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

Palm Beach County officials reacted with anger Wednesday to the passage in the Florida House of Representatives of a joint resolution that would allow voters to decide if they want to expand the homestead exemption from $50,000 to $75,000.

The expansion plan, approved on a vote of 81-35, must be approved by three-fifths of the Senate and then by 60 percent of voters before it could become law on January 1, 2019.

County officials argue that the expanded exemption will suck at least $29 million from its budget. The overall impact on area governments is more than $70 million, they say.

“I’m disgusted that the House leadership would think this is a tax cut for the people,” Commissioner Melissa McKinlay said. “This is a tax shift.”

PBC looking to boost spending to combat heroin/opioid crisis

Palm Beach County Commissioner Hal Valeche at county budget workshop, March 25, 2015 (Staff photo/Eliot Kleinberg)
Palm Beach County Commissioner Hal Valeche (Staff photo/Eliot Kleinberg)

Palm Beach County commissioners, opening discussions about their 2018 budget, are considering setting aside $2 million to combat the ongoing heroin/opioid crisis.

The Palm Beach Post has provided extensive coverage of that crisis, which has devastated families and strained the resources of first responders and hospitals.

Commissioners are considering dipping into its reserves to boost current year spending to $1 million to combat the problem.

“I think this is a drop in the bucket given the scale of the problem,” Commissioner Hal Valeche said of the proposed expenditures.

Commissioner Melissa McKinlay agreed.

“Anyone who fails to see this as the public health crisis that it is is walking around with their eyes closed,” she said.

Check with http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com later today for more on the county’s initial budget discussions.

County picks Texas firm to oversee sales tax projects

A Dallas-based firm with offices in Palm Beach Gardens has been selected as the project manager for the vast array of projects that will be paid for with money from the sales tax increase voters approved in November.

Jacobs Project Management beat out two other firms for the right to track and report the sales tax projects and provide information to the citizens oversight committee, a county-approved body that will monitor sales tax expenditures.

Commissioners ratified Jacobs’ selection Tuesday, authorizing County Administrator Verdenia Baker to begin negotiating a consulting fee with Jacobs.

That fee could be substantial, as the county expects its portion of the sales tax increase to be about $810 million over the next decade for upgrades to parks, roads, bridges and county-owned buildings.

Commissioners, with input from county staff members, will retain final say over which firms will be selected to undertake the sales tax work.

Jacobs will provide project updates to the oversight committee and to county staff.

sales-tax-pic

County seeking reimbursement of Trump costs

Palm Beach County is seeking federal reimbursement for costs associated with escorting and providing security for President-elect Donald Trump, who spent the Thanksgiving holiday at his Mar-A-Lago mansion on Palm Beach.

County Administrator Verdenia Baker said the cost of escorting Trump’s motorcade and providing additional security over the holiday was roughly $250,000.

Baker’s staff is drafting a letter to the county’s U.S. congressional delegation to seek reimbursement. The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office is keeping track of Trump-related costs.

Click here for much more on this story.

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. (Getty Images)
President-elect Donald Trump. (Getty Images)

Bock says she’ll monitor spending of sales tax money

Sharon Bock, Palm Beach County’s clerk and comptroller, has said her office will designate a special account so money from the recently approved increase in the sales tax can be closely monitored.

“A dedicated staff person will be assigned to monitor the receipts coming in, as well as audit any expenditures from this new fund,” Bock said in a statement released Friday.

She added: “Rest assured that my office will examine and account for every penny that is allocated and spent.”

Voters approved a 10-year increase in the sales tax from 6 cents on the dollar to 7 cents on the dollar. The increase is expected to generate $2.7 billion, with the School District of Palm Beach County getting half of that money, the county getting 30 percent of it and cities getting the remaining 20 percent.

County commissioners and staff have said they’ll use the county’s portion – estimated to be about $810 million – to repair parks, roads, bridges and buildings.

In approving the sales tax plan, commissioners also supported the establishment of citizen oversight committees to make sure the money is spent as originally planned. But Bock said she’ll be watching as well.

“As the official ‘watchdog’ of all county funds, I am constitutionally tasked to provide the necessary ‘checks and balances’ on the county’s budget, revenue and spending,” she said.

Bock’s office does have the power to refuse to release funds if she determines that the spending does not serve a public purpose.

“I know your tax dollars are in good hands,” she said. “We are here to protect and preserve public funds with integrity and accountability.”

Palm Beach County Clerk Sharon Bock (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
Palm Beach County Clerk Sharon Bock (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)

 

 

Body cameras in the PBC budget?

Palm Beach County’s proposed $4.3 billion budget includes money for lots of things. But it doesn’t include a penny for law enforcement body cameras.

For Commissioner Shelley Vana, that’s a problem.

Vana agreed with a call made by fellow Commissioner Priscilla Taylor that body cameras should be purchased for use by Palm Beach County sheriff’s deputies.

The cameras, supported by some concerned about law enforcement misconduct, were to be bought with money from an increase in the county’s sales tax. However, as the sales tax debate moved forward, the cameras were removed from the sales tax projects list.

During the first of two public hearings on the proposed 2017 county budget Tuesday night, Vana said she thinks money for the cameras ought to be included in the budget.

“I just think that, if we do a budget without body cameras, it sends a message we’re not serious,” Vana said.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw has said he’d have his deputies wear the body cameras – as long as he didn’t have to account for them in his budget.

Commissioners will hold a final public hearing on the proposed budget on September 19. It’s not clear if commissioners will decided to amend the budge to include the cameras, which, according to County Administrator Verdenia Baker, would cost an estimated $10 million.

Several commissioners have said that, while they are open to the idea of body cameras, they are concerned about ongoing costs associated with their use.

Palm Beach County Commissioner Shelley Vana (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Palm Beach County Commissioner Shelley Vana (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

First of two hearings on Palm Beach County budget set for tonight

moneypalm-beach-county-logoThe first of two hearings on Palm Beach County’s $4.33 billion 2016-2017 budget is set for 6 p.m. tonight,

The commission is likely to keep its tax rate at $4.78 per $1,000 of taxable value, unchanged for a sixth straight year.

If the proposed budget is approved on the second vote, Sept, 19, the county would collect $789.6 million in property taxes in 2017. That’s $59.6 million more than was collected in 2016 because property values have continued their post-recession climb.

Because the tax rate that property owners pay to help repay the county government’s bond debt is shrinking from 15 cents per $1,000 taxable value in 2016 to 13 cents per $1,000 in 2017, the combined county tax rate would be $4.91 per $1,000, 2 cents less than this year’s rate.

At the proposed combined rate, the owner of a $250,000 house with a homestead exemption who paid about $986 in county property taxes in 2015-2016 would see the value of his home increase to $251,750 and pay about $991 in property taxes in 2016-2017. The increase in home value is based on the 0.7 percent maximum increase allowed for homesteaded homes this year under Florida’s Save our Homes constitutional amendment.

That tax figure does not include municipal taxes or taxes levied by other entities such as the School Board and South Florida Water Management District.

Palm Beach County Commission Hearing for 2016-2017 Budget

When: 6 p.m. Tuesday. Where: Sixth-floor chambers, Weisman Palm Beach County Governmental Center, 301 N. Olive Avenue, West Palm Beach

To read more, go later to mypalmbeachpost.com.

 

 

 

Baker lays out proposed PBC budget for 2017

Palm Beach County Administrator Verdenia Baker laid out a proposed budget for 2017, which would hold property tax rates steady and include more than $594 million in funding for law enforcement.

Because of rising property values, taxpayers would pay more. Baker has said the county needs the additional revenue to continue providing residents with expected levels of services.

County commissioners will set the property tax rate on July 12 and then hold a pair of public hearings – one on September 6 and another on September 19, when the final budget will be adopted.

County Administrator Verdenia Baker
County Administrator Verdenia Baker

 

PBC staff to present proposed FY ’17 budget today

Palm Beach County’s staff will present its proposed budget for fiscal year 2017 during a meeting scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. today at the Weisman Governmental Center.

Staff is recommending that property tax rates be held steady, but, because property values are rising, taxpayers would pay a combined $56.8 million more in taxes in 2017 than they are paying this year.

County Administrator Verdenia Baker has said the county needs the additional revenue generated by rising property taxes to continue providing expected levels of service to county residents.

Check with http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com later today for more this topic.

County Administrator Verdenia Baker
County Administrator Verdenia Baker