Slightly fewer voted on third day of early balloting in Palm Beach County

CqJlWCEXYAENxuHThe number of Palm Beach County participating in early voting for the Aug. 30 election was slightly lower Wednesday than it had been Monday and Tuesday, the first two days of the 13-day event, according to the Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections..

The 1,664 voting Wednesday brought the total so far to 5,390. The total was 1,862 Monday and 1,864 Tuesday.

In nine days of voting in March, 54,092 voted, nearly 9,500 of those in the first two days alone, but that was on a Saturday and Sunday, and that election included the presidential primary.

Early voting operates from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Aug. 28. Palm Beach County voters are choosing candidates in 22 contested local, state and national races.

To see a sample ballot for the Aug. 30 vote, or for more information, contact the elections office at 561-656-6200 or visit www.pbcelections.org.

  • Get the candidates’ background and views in their own words in The Post’s exclusive Know Your Candidates online guide, pbpo.st/kycp2016.
  • EXCLUSIVE ELECTION COVERAGE
  • KNOW YOUR CANDIDATES GUIDE
  • One in a series about all races and referendums on Palm Beach County’s Aug. 30 ballots. Series will run daily through Sunday, the day before the start of early voting in the county.
  • Get all The Post’s Aug. 30 election coverage at myPalmBeachPost.com/2016primary
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Proposed sales tax increase was great…before it was bad

A direct mail piece doesn’t just rip Palm Beach County property appraiser candidate Shelley Vana for attending what it described as a Donald Trump rally. It doesn’t just say she took gobs of money from developers and then voted for more growth.

The mail piece also says Vana, a county commissioner, voted for “the largest tax increase in Palm Beach County history.”

That vote, taken in May, was to have voters decide whether the county’s sales tax should be raised from 6 cents on the dollar to 7 cents on the dollar. That increase would generate an estimated $2.7 billion over 10 years for repairs to roads, bridges, schools and county buildings.

Vana does back that sales tax increase. Her opponent in the property appraiser’s race, Dorothy Jacks, would not say if she supports the proposed sales tax increase, which will be on the ballot in November.

“I do not think it is proper for me to advocate for or against an issue which does not directly impact the duties and responsibilities of the Property Appraiser’s office,” Jacks said when asked about the sales tax plan in candidate survey from The Palm Beach Post. ” I am glad the voters get a chance to make a decision on this in November.”

Jacks isn’t taking a position on the sales tax proposal, but Rick Asnani, the man behind the anti-Vana flier, was squarely behind the proposal earlier this year.

Working with the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, Asnani made presentations and pushed hard in favor of what the anti-Vana flier describes as “the largest tax increase in Palm Beach County history.”

When the commission voted not to use sales tax money to pay for projects backed by the Cultural Council, Asnani’s role in the sales tax push diminished.

Palm Beach County Commissioner Shelley Vana (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Palm Beach County Commissioner Shelley Vana (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

Palm Beach County elections video: no crossing party lines in primary

In case you missed it: Florida is a closed primary state. Has been since 1941. Some people were surprised to learn that in the March presidential primary. So the Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections has posted on YouTube a 2½ minute video walking voters through the concept in time for the Aug. 30 election.

On March 15, Donald Trump had a big win in Florida, knocking out the state’s own Marco Rubio and helping cement the Republican nomination. And Hillary Clinton took the Democratic primary, building a big lead that eventually was insurmountable.

A lot of people came to the polls that day wanting to vote in a party other than the one in which they were registered. Many were furious when they learned Florida was one of only 11 states in which you can vote in a primary only in the party for which you’re registered.

On Aug. 30, Palm Beach County voters will choose candidates in 22 contested local, state and national races.

The election office’s new video, posted July 14, explains that while there is the closed primary, everyone can vote in races that are non-partisan or in which a candidate faces no opposition in the general election —- in this case Nov. 8. And all can vote in referendum questions.

To read more, go later to mypalmbeachpost.com.

KNOW YOUR CANDIDATES GUIDE

Get the candidates’ background and views in their own words in The Post’s exclusive Know Your Candidates online guide, pbpo.st/kycp2016.

EXCLUSIVE ELECTION COVERAGE

  • One in a series about all races and referendums on Palm Beach County’s Aug. 30 ballots.
  • Series will run daily through Sunday, the day before the start of early voting in the county.
  • Get all The Post’s Aug. 30 election coverage at myPalmBeachPost.com/2016primary.

More than 3,700 have done early voting so far in Palm Beach County

For a second straight day, more than 1,800 people in Palm Beach County participated in early voting for the Aug. 30 election, according to the Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections..

That brings the total to 3,726 for the first two days of a 13 day window, operating from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Aug. 28. Palm Beach County voters are choosing candidates in 22 contested local, state and national races.

In nine days of voting in March, 54,092 voted, nearly 9,500 of those in the first two days alone, but that was on a Saturday and Sunday, and that election included the presidential primary.

To see a sample ballot for the Aug. 30 vote, or for more information, contact the elections office at 561-656-6200 or visit www.pbcelections.org.

  • Get the candidates’ background and views in their own words in The Post’s exclusive Know Your Candidates online guide, pbpo.st/kycp2016.
  • EXCLUSIVE ELECTION COVERAGE
  • KNOW YOUR CANDIDATES GUIDE
  • One in a series about all races and referendums on Palm Beach County’s Aug. 30 ballots. Series will run daily through Sunday, the day before the start of early voting in the county.
  • Get all The Post’s Aug. 30 election coverage at myPalmBeachPost.com/2016primary
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Commissioners ask county staff to look into sober homes

Palm Beach County Commissioner Priscilla Taylor has directed county staff members to conduct an overview of sober homes in the county, which have generated opposition from those who feel the private, unregulated facilities lead to increased violence and drug abuse in some communities.

“We as commissioners really need to know what’s going on,” Taylor said during a meeting Tuesday.

It is not clear what staff will review, and there is no timetable for the completion of that review.

Taylor’s colleagues were in general agreement with the notion of a review. Commissioner Shelley Vana added that she wants to know what can be done to make sure sober home operators who solicit for out-of-town clients provide those clients with a way to return to their communities if treatment is unsuccessful and ends early.

Palm Beach County Commissioner District 7, Priscilla A. Taylor in West Palm Beach, Florida on March 22, 2016. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Palm Beach County Commissioner  Priscilla A. Taylor (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

Nearly 2,000 voted early Monday in Palm Beach County

SOEA total of 1,862 people cast ballots Monday on the first day of early voting for the Aug. 30 election, according to the Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections.

That’s about a third of the 5,413 that voted on the first day of early voting in March. But that day was a Saturday. And that election included the presidential primary.

In nine days of voting in March, 54,092 voted. For this month’s election, early voting will last 13 days, operating from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Aug. 28.

Palm Beach County voters are choosing candidates in 22 contested local, state and national races.

For the Nov. 8 general election, the deadline to register to vote, or to change party affiliation, is Oct. 11. Early voting runs 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 24-Nov. 6. The deadline to have a ballot mailed to you for that election is Nov. 2.

To see a sample ballot for the Aug. 30 vote, or for more information, contact the elections office at 561-656-6200 or visit www.pbcelections.org.

  • Get the candidates’ background and views in their own words in The Post’s exclusive Know Your Candidates online guide, pbpo.st/kycp2016.
  • EXCLUSIVE ELECTION COVERAGE
  • KNOW YOUR CANDIDATES GUIDE
  • One in a series about all races and referendums on Palm Beach County’s Aug. 30 ballots. Series will run daily through Sunday, the day before the start of early voting in the county.
  • Get all The Post’s Aug. 30 election coverage atmyPalmBeachPost.com/2016primary

PBC honors 92-year-old for fighting elderly scams

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Laredo, Atwater

Fla CFO Jeff Atwater was on hand at Tuesday’s Palm Beach County Commission meeting as the county honored activist Lynn Laredo for work fighting financial exploitation of seniors.

“I’m a Ms., but I’m not a mess,” quipped Laredo, who proudly gave her age: 92.

Atwater, of North Palm Beach, said Laredo developed a video to educate people over 80 about the risks of identity theft and sometimes dresses as “Wonder Woman” for seminars.

“There is a tremendous need for ongoing commitment to financial literacy,” Atwater said, standing alongside Laredo.

New lighting shines brightly on county commissioners

Palm Beach County government is operating in a whole new light today.

Guess that’s what new lighting can do. New lighting was installed in the 6th-floor chambers of the Weisman Government Center where county commissioners meet.

Those lights were shining brightly when commissioners began their meeting this morning, but county staff say the building is in need of more substantial repairs, which could be made with money from an increase in the sales tax. (That’s if voters pass the sales tax referendum.)

new lighting installed in County Commission chambers
new lighting installed in County Commission chambers (Wayne Washington/The Palm Beach Post)

Resolution for dike fix on today’s Palm Beach County Commission agenda

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A resolution urging the federal government to find money to finish shoring up the Lake Okeechobee dike is one of the items on the agenda for today’s meeting of the Palm Beach County Commission.

Other items on the agenda:

Settlement: Set to agree to a $600,000 settlement award in its 2015 federal lawsuit alleging an insurer improperly withheld workers compensation to Larry Aversano, a county Fire-Rescue employee injured in 1986 and 1988.

Change order: Set to accept a change order on work on the roadway near 20-Mile-Bend in western Palm Beach County, which will result in savings of $1.24 million, to be split among the feds, the state and the county.

Water truck: Expected to approve $300,00, to match a federal grant, for a $600,000 high-pressure water truck for Palm Beach International Airport, to clean up debris, spills and other materials from runways and ramps. The county previously had hired contractors but staff said having its own truck was more cost-effective.

Magar: Will honor State Rep. MaryLynn Magar, R-Hobe Sound, who’s ending her 1-year term as chair of the Palm Beach County Legislative Delegation; her likely successor is Vice Chair Bobby Powell, D-West Palm Beach, depending on if he wins his State Senate bid.

Palm Beach County Commission Meeting:

When: 9:30 a.m. Tuesday. Where: Sixth-floor chambers, Weisman Palm Beach County Governmental Center, 301 N. Olive Avenue, West Palm Beach

To read more, go later to mypalmbeachpost.com.